Silicon Valley Is Still The Place To Be


#141

That was my strategy, but prices went up a lot faster than I thought they would. Then I got sticker shock at my property tax bill doubling.


#142

Aaah yes, the old property tax bill doubling impact always thwarts every housing moving scheme of mine too…


#143

That’s why I think it makes a better strategy to decouple primary residence from rental consideration. Often times they are two different sets of criteria anyway. Sometimes it makes sense to pocket that 500K tax free money by selling the primaries and buy cheaper rentals. One is not necessarily attached to the other.


#144

Yeah, but, we want to stay around here remember? Anything cheaper essentially means moving away which really defeats the purpose. End conclusion: one stays in the same, old house.


#145

Only old medical doctors? Young doctors are tired and broke, it would take them a few years to save the down payment.

But I heard that doctors can get mortgages easily, at better terms

My point is that today’s young engineers are reaching their peak or off peak earnings at a very early age. Starting at 120k, I think they will reach their ceiling pretty soon. However, they can buy a house at age 25 instead of doctors at 35. 10 years of early investment can make a huge difference, but too many young engineers lack the savvy and life experience to buy homes. Many people are wasting their early peak and may regret when their skills will be thrown to toilet in 15 years.


#146

Youth is wasted on the young.


#147

Shoot, I understand my bro in law, the surgeon got an interest free stipend from his employer that he used to buy in buying their RWC home.


#148

Why the title of this thread is what it is…

http://www.forbes.com/sites/levelup/2016/12/07/even-rookie-engineers-in-silicon-valley-make-over-100k-a-year/#492d79ed5208


#149

Making 100K out of the gate is good. But what about the trajectory over time? How much do they top out?


#150

Most top out around $160k base unless they go into management or are in a hot area. The issue with hot areas is they rotate every ~10 years, so you go from being essential to over priced pretty fast. Once the technology shifts you’re working at a legacy tech company which has flat revenue and is trying to cut costs to increase profits fast enough for shareholders to be happy. Then the mergers and layoffs start and over priced people have a target on their back. It’s one of the quickest ways to improve profitability.


#151

An engineers shelf life is short…Smart ones buy real estate early and often…I was lucky enough to start buying at 22…Was always way ahead of my friends for a least 10 years…Some have caught up 40 years later…Lawyers and doctors keep getting higher and higher salaries. .Engineers peak at 40…Then you have to go into management or find a new career…


#152

#153

Aah, yes, nothing like free food…

https://www.ft.com/content/cfbed014-bc6a-11e6-8b45-b8b81dd5d080


#154

Perfectly fit the irresponsible attitude of the … Is why Apple doesn’t have free stuffs. We want people with sense of responsibility.


#155

Blocked, what’s the tldr?


#156

Hmm, try this one


#157

Here is an interesting story about what Google employees hated about working there…


#160

Literally move over, Fitbit…

This could be a game changer, no???


#161

Getting fit is another one of those social experiences. What’s the point of hitting up the treadmill if there aren’t any hot men and women around?


#162

Really? Uh, how about just being around longer for your lovely family??? Good enough reason, Sir??? With healthcare costs being what they are, it is very much advisable for EVERYONE to be exercising daily to stay healthy. You actively manage your properties so I imagine you are up and about all the time. I sit in front of multiple monitors all day so exercise is a must for me. No excuses, people!!!