A Way To Tackle The Homeless Problem?


#41

Sure, let’s throw some more money at it…


#42

Why not just arrest and move em out. Simple. Almost all homeless have broken many laws. The criminals should be in jail. The deranged and druggies should be put in rehab programs . The truly innocent can be housed in the liberal progressives spare rooms… like on Curb your Enthusiasm…


#43

There simply is no more room in our jails. That is the problem. Our punishments are not severe enough to deter criminals from trying. Look at the car break-ins. Water it down, up goes the car break-ins. This shouldn’t be surprising to the lawmakers…


#44

The jail can be in Fresno or Mexico. I know plenty of retired people moving to Mexico. We will just bus the homeless to their new retirement home on the streets of Tijuana. Much more pleasant being homeless in a warm dry climate.


#45

Yup, when a program doesn’t work the obvious answer is to spend more money on the program.


#46

Realistically, at least in the Fab 7x7, I would like for us to enforce the no loitering law(s). Make people move along, so less chance of encampment happening. We spend so much money on the homeless, that if one is truly in need of help and wants it, the help is there for you. What is not acceptable is the refusal of such said services and help.


#47

That’s what I like, out of the box thinking…


#48

Anything helps…


#49

#50

“In its three-plus years of operation, the Mission Street Navigation Center took in 2,204 people, and 68 percent of them exited homelessness, according to city figures. More than half of those people who left the streets — 1,177 — did so through the Homeward Bound program, which gives bus tickets to people to return home to receptive family or friends.”

So we could eliminate 1/3rd of homelessness by giving peoole a bus ticket to family? That seems like a really cheap solution. Why isn’t it done on a larger scale?


#51

Los Gatos gives them bus tickets to Santa Cruz, I heard.


#52

If housing price is flat from 2018 to 2028, what would you do now?


#53

Cash-out-refinance while the values are high and you still find a lender with a positive sentiment.

I think there are a number of scenarios other than “flat for 10 years”.


#54

Cash out refi is a good idea. But there will be a lack of investment opportunities in a flat market.

If we have a flat market for 10 years, we have to make sure that we have a healthy rental income so it’s worth holding. At least it should be better than 10 year bond.

What’s your idea of the likely price scenario?


#55

#56

Very interesting article


#57

“ At the same time, according to the Puget Sound Business Journal , the Seattle metro area spends more than $1 billion fighting homelessness every year. That’s nearly $100,000 for every homeless man, woman, and child in King County”

Yup. People in Seattle are getting fed up with the ineffectiveness. It’s another debacle like the bicycle lanes.

A lot of city council members are up for re-election next year. There’s a movement to vote against all of them. The council thinks they can do whatever they want even if polls show most residents disapprove. The head tax is a perfect example. City council finally caved to the will of the people.

There’s a reason I bought outside Seattle. Well, much larger lot size and newer homes helped with the decision too. There’s no way I was going to buy inside the city limits though.


#58

Interesting that the weather (fair amount of rain) is not keeping the problem from really blowing up, unlike here where the weather is fairly mild all year round to make it ultra doable.


#59

Ask the police officers. They can’t do anything about homeless people. Yes, “people”. Their motive to put anybody in jail in order to be helped by evaluating their emotional condition was thrown in the garbage when Reagan dumped them on the streets. Google it.


#60

Reagan is out of the picture. Blame nimbyies enviro nazies the BOS the EPA and any other government organization that dedicates itself to stopping housing development.