Schools


#182

Yes. He does. He’s said thank you many times, and I know he means it. He has offered to work weekends/summer job to pay for some of it when he is legally old enough to. I will probably take him up on that because you appreciate things more when they’re not just handed to you. We’ve also talked about the fact that he might have to do public school for a year or two if we buy a house and he understands that too. And I’ve been straight with him that we aren’t going to be able to pay for college for him. I think though, he should be able to get a merit scholarship at a second tier college, so he should be in good shape.


#183

Aren’t you just delaying the inevitable? A second tier college isn’t going to be challenging compared to a super elite high school. It’ll be difficult to be engaged and challenged, and there’s even less structure to follow.


#184

as the most “simple” thinking man, sending my future kid to a school with rich parents could increase the odds of my kid to be rich, and look at the the “rich list” we have going on for us here and laugh :slight_smile:


#185

IMHO, the goal of becoming very rich is very hard. Better to go for what you like to do, some called it passion.
That is, support your child in doing what he/she likes to do (so long is not criminal :slight_smile: and not damaging to society & humankind :sweat_smile:). Btw, the most important attribute to immensely successful is not technical (I don’t mean STEM) competency, is Political Wisdom & exceptional persuasive communication skill.


#186

How do you define “very rich”?


#187

richer than hanera. jk.


#188

More than $30 million :grinning:
Every graduate should be able to accumulate $5 mil (including owner-occupied primary) by the time they retire at 65. Should be a millionaire (including owner-occupied primary, if any) before the age of 35.


#189

nah, i meant >100m really :slight_smile:


#190

Possibly. But if it has a grad school, then he just needs to start in the upper level classes and move on to graduate work in Junior/Senior year. There’s also UC Berkeley.

Not worried about structure. He’s very organized.

Maybe he could just go for a year at Harvard then drop out and start the next hot startup… :slight_smile:


#191

Man come on, nobody wants to go to MIT?!


#192

Havard grads might be richer than MIT. Havard parents could be even more so. It’s hard to imagine rich kids want to go to MIT


#193

Yeah, but you have to graduate and then do your startup. Cheaper to go to Harvard and dropout. :slight_smile:


#194

Yeah, i gotta do that.


#195

MIT alumni did Dropbox and litecoin in CA. What do they do in east coast?


#196

Teradyne, iRobot, Bose, Akamai off the top of my head.


#197

Pretty strong in entrepreneurship. How about Wall Street?


#198

Yeah. A lot of the graduates go to Wall Street for a while.


#199

Uh oh, a blackeye for home schooling???


#200

The homeschool community is livid that this is being used as an example to send CPS to check in on every one of them.

Let’s keep in mind a couple of things:
Abuse can happen anytime and most kids are in public and private schools when it does. Just look up “mom kills kids” on google, and you’ll get a ton of stories. Most are not homeschoolers.

Some of the victims in this story were ADULTS! So if you’re going to check on homeschoolers, you’ll need to also send people in to check on welfare recipients or people who are unemployed or those 28 year olds playing games in their parents’ basement. Because maybe they’re not playing games but actually locked up. Eh?

13 out of 40,000,000 people=1 in 3,000,000. Chances of being hit by lightening? 1 in 1,000,000. So people want to pay taxes to go check on every homeschooling family because one family had issues? Just seems a little crazy. Stay inside when it rains.


#201

Gosh, you sound like @marcus335 defending gun rights…:grin: