Trading wars impact


#1278

Book rental value isn’t the same as cash flow


#1279

The Singapore property tax system is just like our property tax. You have to pay it regardless of the property running at a profit or loss. What is different tho’ they come out each year with the estimated value of renting the property and you pay a tax based on the estimated rental value. If you are a resident owner, then you only a partial amount of this.


#1280

Singapore property tax is really low, only a few hundred dollars a year. It’s similar to what you pay DMV

Close to zero if you think of the high property value


#1281

https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/NQ/
vs
https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/NQ=F/

is the difference tomato going complete nuts to super calm in <1 second.


#1282

Futures are 0.4-0.5% up.


#1283

And another day with futures up similarly. I sold a bunch of sq options today for profit. will not buy until next unreasonable drop (like tariffs, drop in a stock for no reason, etc. I should maybe load some IQ, i am down on that so far).


#1284

No more unreasonable drop. Only unreasonable spike from here on out…


#1285

it’s fine by me. but expect china to do something, so far they have been silent?
also individual stocks can have unreasonable drops. Notable ones: Sq (dropped in november), Costco (dropped last august) etc.


#1286

Why Singaporeans need to understand two global trends that will shape nation’s future

To state my essential argument upfront: China’s rise is not necessarily America’s decline.
US-China relations are of course, the most important bilateral relationship in the world.

The US and China are not natural partners, nor are they inevitable enemies. Neither the US nor China finds their ambivalent relationship comfortable. The Trump administration’s approach towards trade reflects this discomfort; so does President Xi Jinping’s attempt to find an alternative to China’s interdependence with the US through his Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

America under the Trump administration no longer embraces an open and generous definition of leadership. That basic point is anxiety about what this means for international order now that America is no longer prepared to be as open or as generous as before, and probably will not be for the foreseeable future. The resulting uncertainties affect all countries, China included. The looming prospect of a trade war is one indication.

To lead, China must work with America. It can supplement, but not substitute for, American leadership. This is for the simple reason that an open global order cannot be led on the basis of a still largely closed Chinese model. The 18th Party Congress of 2012 recognised that the Chinese model that led to the spectacular growth of the 1990s was not sustainable over the long-term. The 18th Party Congress recognised that a new normal of slower, but still respectable, growth would over the long-term have to depend on enhanced market efficiencies. This posed a fundamental – perhaps even existential – question for China. A bigger role for the market implies a loosening of control. But how to give the market a greater role without risk to the rule of the Chinese Communist Party?

For existential reason, China must open its market but the question is how fast. Trump’s action is making hard for China to do so paradoxically.

The second trend is a global resurgence of real or imagined identities of various kinds – national, tribal, ethnic, gender, religious or secular – resulting in a global resurgence of identity politics.


#1287

Japan and Germany have the market open, but they are still big in export. As Chinese economy becomes bigger and population becomes older, its trade may become more balanced.

Greek, Italian and Spanish are good consumers and they get to enjoy their life and enjoy the hard work shipped from Japanese, German and Chinese. Americans don’t like cheap merchandise, they want to work hard and enjoy an expensive shooing experience


#1288

Greek, italian and spanish dont have the money


#1289

Money is not important as long as your life is enjoyable


#1290

That makes them less relavant in trade though?
Oh man, lazy italians, enjoying life for sure!


#1291

#1292

• BMW (OTCPK:BMWYY) is considering shifting a significant portion of its U.S. production to China due to the risk of trade war blowback. The BMW stance was tipped off in a statement made by the chief of the National Association of Foreign Trade Zones at a Commerce Department hearing.

• The German automaker said last month in comments submitted to the Commerce Department that its heavy investment in U.S. manufacturing and jobs is tied to lack of tariffs, according to Bloomberg.

• General Motors (GM -0.9%) has also warned Commerce that it could shrink U.S. operations if it can’t import vehicles and parts. Hyundai (OTCPK:HYMLF), Volkswagen (OTCPK:VLKAY) and Mazda (OTCPK:MZDAY) have also hinted at pulling back on U.S. investment.


#1293

#1294

Russia, Russia, Russia, Russia, Russia


#1295

Well let’s wait for Mueller’s final report :slight_smile:


#1296

There can be more then one opponent. The attacks on US have 2 primary state actors but they are interested and focused on different areas. China is focused on commercial aspects and Russia is focused on political aspects. (Russia is back to fighting the cold war. Kind of makes sense is Putin is ex-KGB and more focused on self enrichment and political power rather then economic power. China is playing the long game and understands economic power is key to become a superpower)


#1297

The world alliances are getting redrawn right now. Part of me wants Trump to be around for 6 more years to see this played out. China is courting Europe very energetically now while Trump is badmouthing then daily. Really interesting to see what the end game will look like.