Coursera

Anyone use Coursera to brush up on their programming skills? If so, any advice about using Coursera? Should one not bother and look for free courseware elsewhere or just youtube videos?

I’m looking to learn things like Python/C++/Javascript/Git and looking to brush up on databases/SQL/etc.

I feel like having projects given to me would be helpful, and that videos work much better for me than reading a book. Coursera seems to satisfy that, but I’m not really sure if I’ll end up with a piecemeal set of courses and knowledge gaps.

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I tried coursera once when I want to get my feet wet with big data (out of curiosity - not for a job change). They have good courses. I remember taking one on R. But such courses are also available on many other sites (I remember IBM had them). I use udemy a lot too. I have found some courses for as little as $10.

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From my experience - Coursera is good. Udacity better but more expensive. Udemy cheap and good for grasping the basics.

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Thanks! THis is very helpful. I started looking at udacity and it appears to have a free minicourse on git which is probably a great place to start.

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Coursera has really good Data Science and Machine Learning courses. That’s their bread and butter content. Their python course library is also pretty good (instructor for python course is one of the best one).

You can also consider LinkedIn Learning which has a lot of shorter and engaging courses too especially if you are getter ng LinkedIn premium subscription as package deal.

@Terri

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I hired a tutor for python (for me) from here: https://k12.utdallas.edu/. I had originally signed up for my kids, but I asked if I was allowed to use the tutoring and they said sure. :slight_smile:

started from the very beginning.

also, the course on Kaggle are good - they teach you something, and then have you practice it. it is free.

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My kid just got started on this course:

https://www.udemy.com/course/complete-python-bootcamp/

I sit next to her during class to answer her questions and take care of the mechanics like software installation etc. So far so good. The course is pretty darn long and looking at the material it’s pretty comprehensive. To the point I am a bit worried it may be too much for my kid.

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We evaluated both of them. Coursera is setup to be similar to a college course. Udemy is in much smaller bits. Our engineers preferred Udemy, so we purchased it. I used Udemy quite a bit.

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Due to nature of the courses at coursera, the classes can get complicated at times. It should be supported by a live person.

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Yeah. I’m sure there’s a balance between being supported by a competent person and price… And I’m guessing most of us are cheapskates.

That is why you have gig economy. There are lot of tutors who will be willing to teach on partime basis. Think of education version of uber and airbnb.
CA just killed the gig economy by requiring gig workers to be classified as employee.

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The labor industry is moving towards gig and WFH.

In Singapore, many startup restaurants are WFH :grinning:. Order online, collect yourself (or use delivery services).

So true “home-cooked meals just like mom makes” :stuck_out_tongue:

Lot of tutoring opportunities for overseas workers, particularly where english is prevalent (india, singapore, phillipines etc)

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I know a 10th grader girl who is tutored by a Berkeley student through zoom. $25/hr

this exists here. I just ordered from shef.com for Monday dinner as I am out and DH doesn’t cook :roll_eyes: shefs cook at home and then deliver to your house, so its hyperlocal
Shef | Authentic dishes. Homemade. Delivered.

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These kinds of services (chefs, kitchen, utensils for rent) have been always available. But, online platforms have brought them (and many others) together to a single point of contact.

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yes, but the ease is amazing. I have long had Indian “aunties” cooking a few dishes weekly for me, mostly at my house (some were pickup from their house, which is also annoying), and it required a lot of work on my end, sourcing the auntie, coordinating what gets made, getting groceries etc. Now, with 30 seconds of clicking, we will get the same experience, delivered to our front door, next week.

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Yes, to use language of economics, we can say that these online platforms are reducing the two cost :slight_smile:
search cost and transaction cost

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