Faith-based investing

When God is your portfolio manager
Biblically responsible investing is booming, as some Christians move to match their faith with their stock buys.

Read in The Wall Street Journal: When God is your portfolio manager

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Or you can do the reverse and go with VICEX. A good choice if a recession really is in the cards. It has high fees and has underperformed over the last 10 years but so have most managed funds. This year it has roughly matched the S&P.

The Vegan religion fanatics have turned Beyond Meat into the next bitcoin. Down 100 points from high. Pot stocks, too.
Bad year ahead for pot smoking vegans?

How can one combine two unrelated concepts: faith (Bible) and money?

I’d say you can’t. Keep them compartmentalized and use your gains to fund causes which align with your faith.

Faith-based investing is nonsense. The Bible warns: For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows." (1 Timothy 6:10) So, those interested in investments are eager to earn more money, and this desire has nothing to do with faith. The community that I’ve recently joined https://firstchurchlove.com teaches that a person may have a tendency to judge others because of a distorted view of money. For example, the rich may think that all the poor are lazy. And those with a small income can hastily conclude that all wealthy people are greedy and think only about money.

Loving it, coveting it, yes.
But money itself?

There’s nothing evil about your neighbor’s wife but it’s a sin to covet her.

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Faith-based investing is nonsense. The Bible warns: For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows." (1 Timothy 6:10) So, those interested in investments are eager to earn more money, and this desire has nothing to do with faith.

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The Old Testament has stories of poor folk - even slaves - who ended up rich. But they didn’t get that way by seeking riches. They got that was through savvy, faith and a lot of hard work.

Most rich people have a passion for something; getting rich is a side effect of pursuing that passion. Even legendary investors like Buffet do what they do out of passion for the art of it (or science depending on your take). The motivating factor is the process, not the end result.

You got to believe in something. I believe I will have another beer.
Meanwhile the whole world is going nuts.

The whole point of faith-based investing is that your put God first, money second. So investments should be ethical and moral. Personally I wouldn’t invest in pharma stocks for this reason. Most pharmaceutical companies don’t care about your health, they’d rather keep you sick and sell you more meds.

Faith does not preclude you making money, being rich, or investing. But you will have someone to answer to God for what you did with your money. That’s why charity is often driven by churches.

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