Apple plans new $1B campus in Austin


#41

Tell her you want to be a 过江龙.


#42

I am past my prime. At best I can only be a 過江蟲 。。。 :cry:


#43

The rising home prices and office rents have been both good and bad. Good for landlords and investors. And bad for tenants and buyers.

Landlords and investors are buyers too :grinning:

Buyers are moving from other markets at record rates, one recent report from the Dallas Business Journal found that nearly 300 companies moved to Texas from California in a years’ time

By buyers, guess author is referring to employees of those 300 companies.

“What is driving the increase in property values is not improvements to properties, but the appraised value of the land,” she said. “Because believe me, when I say, he hasn’t done $85,000 worth of improvements to his land in three years.”

I mentioned this many times in this forum. Travis County has wised up. Is difficult to justify raising improvement when you did nothing. The jump in appraised land value is pretty high in 2018. City also wisely dropped appraised improvement, apparently accounting for depreciation.

Already, builders have not been able to keep up with the demand for entry-level single-family homes in the city. As a result, there is a lack of “affordable” single-family, entry-level homes in the Austin area, which has forced many families to move to the suburbs of Cedar Park, Round Rock, and Leander.

This realtor is talking nonsense. Obviously can’t add new construction in a matured estate. Nothing wrong with Cedar Park, Round Rock and Leander, not that far away.


#44

Notice price appreciation has slow down in 2018 just like in SFBA.
Impact of the new Campus will likely happen near completion so manch has three years to convince his wife to move to Austin. Tell her to home cook more and you would stay at home to eat more often.


#45

Andrew Vallejo, a Redfin agent in Austin, said that over the last two years the majority of his clients are from the Bay Area, and a large portion of them work for tech companies. The new Apple campus will be housed close to North Austin, which is about 10 miles from downtown and a popular location for tech employers. “When people come to me and ask where in Austin to invest, I tell them North Austin,” Vallejo said. “Tech companies are already having a major impact on the Austin market, but the Apple announcement is adding to the buzz.”

Eric Hegwer, another Redfin agent in Austin, said North Austin is attractive to major companies like Apple largely because it’s a residential neighborhood with proximity to highly rated schools, which is helpful for recruiting tech workers with families and children. The neighborhood is also set to be the site of a new Major League Soccer stadium in the coming years.


#46

manch,

That’s what I have been telling the forum. Use your persuading comms that you learn from college. Make it a 2019 resolution to convince your wife to move to North Austin & its North suburbs. Tell her, recently HMart, Ranch 99 and 85deg setup there. Retailers and restaurants are following the crowd/ money. Still early, RE has not ran that much yet… just jogging… no sprinting yet. No need to go to Down Town, there is a shopping paradise in The Domain. Btw got Costco :slight_smile: and HEB, Texas grocery.


#47

Why? He will reach his dream $20M from here ! All he needs to buy real estate at strategic locations, hold for life. He will retire with 20M. That is the magic of Bay Area real estate !


#48

When are you moving to Austin for good?


#49

Look at the multi-decade chart. Prices in Bay Area has been rising stratospherically… you know what would follow next?


#50

North Austin is attractive to major companies like Apple largely because it’s a residential neighborhood with proximity to highly rated schools, which is helpful for recruiting tech workers with families and children. The neighborhood is also set to be the site of a new Major League Soccer stadium in the coming years.

Very good K-12 schools comparable to SV :slight_smile:

The median tenure at Apple is only two years, which is actually long compared to the tenure at Amazon or Google.

SWEs have no loyalty?

Tech companies are constantly recruiting and often poach talent away from each other, so they tend to open offices in the same cities. That’s because it’s much easier to convince a worker to switch companies if you don’t also have to convince that worker to relocate.”

:joy:


#51

I am not worried/concerned about recessions or real estate downturns here. My real estates are like your AAPL shares, bought at low, holding long.

As long as IPOs are coming, like UBER & LYFT - even failure releases, this area goes up at 5% appreciation YOY.

As per Manch, he will buy once a year real estate. Even if he buys once it 2 years,next 10 years, he will be able to make enough to retire easily here.

The key is to invest (either real estate or stocks).


#52

But he can immediately enjoy a super duper retirement NOW in Austin. Actually he is retired, no need to stay in SFBA. You can’t because you’re still WORKING :triumph: In fact, he doesn’t need the $5M per human target in Austin.


#53

I have a wife who insists on living in the most expensive area in the US… :cry:


#54

As long as anyone working actively or doing business actively, better to be in bay area. Keep accumulating assets and decide finally when they retire !

Full early retirement is boring, but partial retirement is perfectly fine after attaining financial independence status.


#55

You talk like early feminism by SAHM. We are not doomed to work. Your thinking trap you into working at this age. I laze around since mid 40s.

Manch,

Got a grocery store call Hong Kong :joy:, a restaurant call Din Ho :rofl:. Also got a new Ramen :crazy_face:


#56

Most of us are in peak earning season, esp between 45 and 60, through business or W2 income. It is mandatory to accumulate as much savings as possible without compromising work life balance.

This way you enjoy life as well as earn (most of you do using business income). This will extend the healthy life.

Partial retirement is perfect plan for work life balance when financial independence reached. This way, anything added is bonus (safety) for us.

Full retirement is good when health does not permit working any more. Learn from Steve Jobs !


#57

Source: High-Tax State Exodus - WSJ

U.S. population growth fell to an 80-year low last year amid declining birth rates, a new Census report shows. But it’s also telling that some states are booming while others are suffering a European-style sclerosis of population loss and slow economic growth.

One side effect of a strengthening national economy has been a widening disparity in state growth rates. The eight fastest-growing states by population last year were located in the West or South (Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Florida, Washington, Colorado and Texas).

And what do you know? These states have also experienced rapid employment and GDP growth spurred by low tax rates and policies generally friendly to business and job creation. Nevada, Arizona, Texas, Washington, Utah, Florida and Colorado ranked among the eight states with the fastest job growth this past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nevada, Texas, Washington and Florida have no income tax.

Florida recorded the highest level of net domestic migration last year and has gained 1.2 million people from other states since 2010. Many Florida transplants are retirees and tax refugees from the Northeast, but businesses of all sorts are also recruiting young workers from other states to serve the state’s booming population that has reached 21.3 million.

Then there’s California. Despite its balmy weather and thriving tech industry, the Golden State last year lost more people to other states than it gained from foreign immigration. Since 2010, a net 710,000 people have left California for other states. One reason is high housing prices, fueled by onerous land and zoning regulations, which have driven out thousands of middle-income families.

Jobs and businesses have also fled the state’s high taxes and regulation. A study this month by business relocation consultant Joe Vranich estimates that 1,800 businesses shifted jobs or capital out of California in 2016 and about 13,000 companies have left the state since 2008. Over the last decade $76.7 billion in capital and 275,000 jobs have moved out of the state.

While California’s population continues to grow because of its relatively high birth rate and foreign immigration, other states that are hostile to business have been less blessed. Nine states lost population last year including Alaska, Connecticut, Louisiana, Hawaii, Illinois, Mississippi, New York, West Virginia and Wyoming. Alaska, Louisiana, West Virginia and Wyoming are heavily dependent on the vagaries of energy prices, but the economic malaise in Connecticut, Illinois, Hawaii and New York is self-inflicted.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently blamed cold weather for the state’s population exodus, but last year frigid New Hampshire with no income tax attracted 3,900 newcomers from other states. Last year’s federal tax reform limited the deductibility of state-and-local taxes and may be driving more affluent households out of high-tax states, though it’s too early to have hard data. Immigration flows into New York City mask the economic debacle of upstate despite Mr. Cuomo’s corporate-welfare programs.

Illinois’s population has declined by 157,000 over the past five years, which is equivalent to the mid-sized city of Rockford. According to research outfit Wirepoints, more than 114,000 residents left the state on net in 2018 and nearly 1.5 million people since 2000. Cold weather? While Illinois’s population has declined by 0.8% since 2010, Indiana’s has grown 3.1% and Wisconsin’s by 2.2%.

These population shifts mean that several states including New York, Illinois and Minnesota are likely to lose House seats after the 2020 reapportionment. States that have been rapidly adding population like Arizona, Florida and Texas are likely to increase their representation. It’d be nice to think this would finally prompt Democratic politicians to rethink their anti-growth policies. But with state political cultures dominated by public unions and welfare spending, they probably require a much deeper crisis to face reality.

America as a whole can thank the Founders for creating a federalist system that allows the economic and political safety valve of interstate policy competition.


#58

Illegals will take over the state. They have kids at a much higher rate. Just wait until their kids become the biggest political force in California. They’ll kick all the old, white democrats to the curb.