Trading wars impact


#1763

don’t think they have the full details yet


#1764

#1765

twitter twitter opinion from some dudes making 60k a yr.


#1766

Are you sure about that? The white population is declining here due to a lack of babies.


#1767

Babies are good, regardless of color.


#1768

Let’s see how Africa fares first.


#1769

Now that Dems took back the house, when will this stupidity end?


#1770

American Express, don’t leave home without it!!!

https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-approves-american-express-card-service-addressing-u-s-concerns-about-markets-1541766874


#1771

#1772

US and China conflict goes way beyond trade, says Ray Dalio, founder of world’s largest hedge fund

The dispute between the U.S. and China over trade deficits and surpluses is rather trivial compared to the broader philosophical differences between the world’s two biggest economic superpowers, Bridgewater Associates founder Ray Dalio told CNBC on Thursday.


#1773

There are differences but human beings more or less behave the same way. We all want make money and be happy. So don’t worry and ignore the fear mongers.


#1774

China Is Paying for Most of Trump’s Trade War, Research Says


#1775

Lose-lose strategy is the new paradigm :scream:


#1777


#1778

(s) I guess that’s why imports from China are up 15-20% and exports to China are down 5% (/s)


#1779

#3 below is due to tariffs, but it is due short term measures by businesses
#2 could be due to tariffs but could be currency manipulation by the Chinese govt.
#1 US economy is firing means trade war hasn’t affected the economy

  1. the U.S. economy is firing on all cylinders and sucking in more Chinese imports as it grows;
  2. the cost of tariffs have been offset by a weaker Chinese currency;
  3. American companies are stockpiling imports ahead of the threat of even higher tariffs.

The rising deficit with China is probably a short-term phenomenon, and seems unlikely to persist if Trump follows through with his threat to extend tariffs to all Chinese imports and raise rates from the current 10% to 25% should the two nations fail to reach a deal before the end of the year.


#1780

Do you dispute the study that came out with these distribution of tariff effects between the 2 countries?


#1781

I don’t have the view for the broader market, but I know that is definitely not the split for my business.


#1782

I skimmed thru the paper. It’s based on the assumption you can find perfect substitute of those Chinese imports from other countries.

Anyone who has run a business knows it’s BS. Businesses establish relationships with the Chinese factories over many years. Trust is an issue. Quality control is an issue. Price is an issue. Yeah, it’s not as easy as pressing a button.

This is a ground level view on what tariffs mean for tiny American businesses:


#1783

Or maybe he should move production to another country, such as Vietnam? “That’s not as easy as it sounds,” he said. “To begin with, it’s not worth doing unless the cost savings is going to be more than $50 per bicycle. Not to mention the R&D and travel costs of sourcing a new factory, and having samples made and tested. Every bike model we bring into this country from a new supplier we have to send to the Consumer Product Safety Commission for testing. So moving production to another country would be a big effort with a lot of costs we would never recover. There’s also a risk if you’ve built your reputation, as we have, working with one or two suppliers. Will a new manufacturer understand what we’re looking for and give us the same level of quality?”